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to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stormed the offices at the muslim brotherhood from which president morsi draws his support. they ransacked the building and then set it on fire. from outside his presidential palace today, mr. morsi addressed the nation. he said the new measures are designed to cut through political gridlock. "it was allah's will that i became the president" he said "and we need to go forward with the new steps, not backwards." but only 52% of egyptians voted for the president. now many of those who didn't worry that mr. morsi wants to stifle democracy and impose his own islamist vision on the country. >> mason: we're joined by holly williams in cairo. holly, given the scale of the protests, is there any sign morsi might change his mind? >
the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we heard the protests, the slogan, leave, leave, leave. we're hearing it again today. people saying they're not
demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egyptian cities, aiming their anger at mr. morsi, seems very similar to last year, of course. last year the anger was aimed at mr. mubarak. the demonstrators managed to topple him. today, victor, very similar slogans and chants, chants of leave, leave, leave, chants of we won't leave until this government leaves. the same things, the same things we heard last year and now it looks like these demonstrators, just like 2011, are going to do a sit-in. they're putting up stents, look for this to continue for the coming hours. maybe through the weekend, victor. >> we take this a step further now, reza. the only reason that mohamed morsi was able to take power was because he was elected after the people of egypt decided they were done with centralized power with the mubarak government. why do you think he took this step? what motivated this power grab? >> reporter: well, he won't describe it as a power grab. his opponents are describing it as a power grab. but his position, the muslim brotherhood, which is his movement, their position is they want to
where we were before. >> brown: among the protestors in cairo were two men who ran against mr. morsi-- hamdin sabbahi from the leftist al- karamah party, and constitution party founder mohamed el- baradei, who tweeted yesterday that morsi had appointed himself "a new pharaoh." in his decree, morsi also held out the possibility of a second trial for hosni mubarek for the killings of protestors. >> suarez: to explain why morsi took these steps and the reaction that followed, i'm joined by nathan brown, an expert on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)